Scientists Map Chromosome Movement For the First Time Ever, Turns Out it is Like a Ballet

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Scientists have been studying human chromosomes for years now looking at everything from the DNA mutations that could produce superhumans to the possibility of creating a synthetic human genome. Never before, however, has anyone considered exploring the movement of these DNA molecules.

The first-ever mapping of chromosome movements

Now, new research out of the University of Texas at Austin has used computer modeling to map, for the very first time in history, the movement of a chromosome. The result is a graceful dance resembling a ballet that illustrates how billions of DNA base pairs manage to elegantly pack themselves into an inconceivably small space without ever getting tangled.

“Rather than the structure, we chose to look at the dynamics to figure out not only

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