See How the World's First 3D Printed Brake Caliper Held Up When Put to the Test

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One of the biggest names in luxury cars Bugatti (owned by Volkswagen Group) could revolutionize how brakes are produced.

Bugatti made headlines earlier this year when it promised to have the world’s first 3D printed brake caliper ready for testing. Now, the company recently debuted that caliper, showcasing exactly how well it works in a new video on Volkswagen’s channel.

According to Bugatti, the caliper is “the world’s largest 3D printed titanium pressure functional component ever produced on one of the most powerful brake test benches on the market.”

It took over 45 hours to shape and melt this one titanium caliper with four lasers. While that process looked great on film, many car enthusiasts understood that process doesn’t work for

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